April 2014 Newsletter

Sheila Gilmore MP HeaderWestminster report

Spring in St James' ParkSpring is here and politicians’ minds turn to…… Elections! Normally at this stage of the political cycle we would be in a middle of a ‘will he/won’t he’ media frenzy about a possible General Election. The introduction of a five year fixed term Parliament has put paid to that. The downside is that it already feels that Parliament is becalmed, with much Parliamentary time taken up either with relatively uncontroversial legislation or with ‘general’ debates. Last year’s Queen’s Speech was thin in content, and the assumption is that the same will happen this June, not least because it will be followed by a short Parliamentary session ending around this time next year. That, of course, should not be mistaken for Government not governing, because there is plenty of government action going on, and plenty for Select Committees to monitor.

We’ve All Got Budgets George
BudgetIn recent years Chancellors have been criticised for ‘leaking’ so much of the Budget that the main event is a bit of a bore.  This year Osborne promised a ‘rabbit’ out of his red box.  This proved to be proposals on pensions .  So much of a rabbit some are worried that an almost throwaway proposal in a Budget, sketched out on the back of the proverbial envelope, may have unintended consequences for pensions, savings and pensioner incomes long into the future.  Others have hailed the freedom the proposals give to people to spend ‘their own money’.  It will take some time to find who is right.  I can’t help but remember that the last Government which ‘freed up’ people in the pensions field was in the 1980s.   Then people were given the freedom to opt out of the state earning related pension scheme (SERPS)  and encouraged to take up private pensions instead.  I think it is agreed by most observers that this led to considerable pensions mis-selling, and many people not paying into a pension at all.  I would be interested to hear your views.

Following the Budget there are four days of budget debates and I spoke on the first day this year.

Dodgy Jobs Statistics
At the start of the month the UK Statistics Authority upheld yet another complaint from me regarding the use of statistics by the Department for Work and Pensions – the fourth in the last year. This followed a Work and Pensions Select Committee hearing in November 2013 during which senior civil servant Neil Couling quoted unpublished data to defend the Government’s Work Programme. Without prior access to the data, it was difficult for my committee colleagues and I to hold Mr Couling – and the Ministers to whom he reports – to account, something the chair of UKSA Sir Andrew Dilnot described as ‘a matter of regret’. This story was picked up by the Huffington Post.

Dodgy Jobs Websites
C4newsI then appeared on Channel 4 News to discuss claims that more than 11,000 positions currently advertised on the Government’s Universal Jobmatch website may be bogus. On top of that Channel 4 had shown that as many as one third of the jobs advertised were duplicates or in ‘self employed’ opportunities such as catalogue distribution where the first thing you have to do is pay £150 up front to get started. In a debate last year I likened this to the unemployed in the 1930s going on the road as brush sellers. My colleagues and I have been flagging this up for some time but it was good to get Channel 4 highlighting this.

In preparation for the rollout of Universal Credit, existing Jobseekers Allowance claimants have been required to use the site since March 2013, or face having their benefits stopped. I made the point that people shouldn’t have to waste their time applying for jobs that don’t exist, and that DWP must get better at identifying and deleting suspicious adverts. The trouble is that the contract they entered into didn’t include this kind of regular monitoring.

Personal Independence Payment
On 18 March the DWP Select Committee published a report on Personal Independence Payment, which replaces Disability Living Allowance for people of working age, and is intended to help with the additional costs of living with a disability. The main issue our report highlighted is the long delays – sometimes up to six months – people are facing before they are given a decision on whether or not they qualify for support. This is driving vulnerable people to real financial and emotional hardship, something I emphasised in an article for Progress. Our committee also criticised Iain Duncan Smith and Tory Chairman Grant Shapps for using statistics to promote ‘negative views’ of disabled people, something that was picked up by Political Scrapbook.

Bedroom Tax
As part of a feature for the House Magazine I participated in an email exchange with Tory MP Stephen Mosley on the Bedroom Tax. This policy reduces a claimant’s Housing Benefit award by around £14 for every spare room they have. Stephen argued that this simply mirrored changes made by the previous Labour Government to Housing Benefit in private rented sector, but he failed to acknowledge that this only applied to new tenancies – it wasn’t applied retrospectively as the Bedroom Tax is. In response I emphasised that even if tenants wanted to downsize, they can’t due to the lack of affordable housing, and the policy could well end up costing more overall than it saves.

Housing
The Scottish Fabians have published a pamphlet called ‘A Pragmatic Vision for a Progressive Scotland’, which contains a series of essays from Scottish Labour MPs on what a new offer from our party might look like.

598tenementsI took the opportunity to highlight the current shortage of affordable housing, which is forcing people on low incomes into the private rented sector, where rents are expensive, and can only be paid for with help from Housing Benefit. As a result only £1 of every £20 spent by Government on housing goes on actually building homes, while £19 goes on subsidising rents. I set out various ideas about how we might redress the balance, using Edinburgh as an example.

High Speed Two
On 17 March the new Chairman of HS2, Sir David Higgins, published his review of the project. HS2 offers the prospect of faster journeys between Edinburgh and England’s big cities, which would make our city a more attractive place to do business and create jobs. In the long term it could also allow rail to compete with air travel, reducing the number of short-haul flights and carbon emissions as a result. The first phase of the line to Birmingham is due to open in 2026, with trains then travelling at conventional speeds to Scotland. I welcomed Sir David’s report as it suggests extending the line to Crewe by 2027, and completing the whole project by 2030 – three years earlier than previously planned.

Social Care
Social Care is devolved to the Scottish Parliament and so I don’t normally get involved in debates on the issue at Westminster (although the issues the rest of the UK face are very similar to those in Scotland). However I have for some time been campaigning for a change in the law so people in one country of the UK can freely move to another, safe in the knowledge that any care package they receive from their current local authority will move with them – something that isn’t guaranteed at present. Earlier this month the Care Bill went through its Report Stage in the House of Commons and I proposed an amendment to address this problem – you can read my speech here. Although the Government rejected this, the Minister committed to bring forward a set of principles by November that would deal with this issue.

Youth Jobs Guarantee
Too many young people in Scotland are struggling to find work and are not seeing any economic recovery at all, something parents in Edinburgh East know all too well. The number of young people in the UK aged 18-24 claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance for over a year has doubled from 28,300 in May 2010 to 56,100 today. Being out of work is demoralising for anyone, but when you can’t get your first step into the working world the effect on young people can be very harmful.

JobsGuaranteeI’d like to see the next government build on the success of the Future Jobs Fund and work with the private and voluntary sectors to ensure that young jobseekers, who have been on benefit for 12 months or more, get a chance to work. My colleagues and I would ensure adults aged 25 or over claiming benefits for more than 24 months would also be included in the scheme. Government could cover a portion of training and admin costs in addition to wages and employee’s national insurance. See more on my website.

Badger Cull
Badger598A large number of constituents have contacted me about the Badger Cull. There is now considerable evidence that it has not actually worked – leaving aside the cruelty involved in the process. Another debate on this took place on Thursday 13th March in the House of Commons. There was strong cross party support for ending the cull and looking more energetically at the alternative of vaccination. Despite the overwhelming vote for this (albeit Government ministers and many of their backbenchers were ‘not present’ it seems the Government is again going to ignore this and are likely to be going ahead with more culling in the near future.

Constituency Report

Student accommodation
Southside residents and I are relieved Development Management Sub-committee members agreed with officers and refused the application for student accommodation at Lutton Court. With plans for further student accommodation in this area this application has been a much needed test of the Council’s own policies in relation to student numbers.

Local residents made an excellent address to members explaining the impact high student numbers can have on local communities. They appealed to planners and the University to manage the concentration of the student population in this part of the city. Recognising the vitality and economic benefit students bring to our city, residents called for planners to ensure student populations revitalise parts of Edinburgh where the council regeneration is ongoing.

We must now see Lutton Court put to good use. I’d like to see the council work with partners to encourage different buyers to come forward. Residents have their own ideas about future use and said they would welcome mews type homes to satisfy demand for family housing in the Southside.

Meadow_Lane

And more blocks could be in the pipeline –
Last month I wrote of plans from Unite at the Homebase site. While I hope it is clear that plans for further student accommodation in this area will not be welcome, details of three more blocks have been published in the Council’s weekly lists:

  • Meadow Lane (14/00884/PAN). This application is at the ‘PAN’ stage which is a 12 week consultation conducted by the developer. A public exhibition will be held 4.30pm-7.30pm on 23rd & 24th April at David Hume Tower Conference Room.
  • Lothian Street (14/00731/FUL). A much smaller development opposite Potterrow, this proposed conversion of a care home is for 11 studios. Submit comments by 4th April using reference number 14/00731/FUL on the Council’s planning portal.
  • Stanley Place (14/00877/FUL). Proposed demolition of garages and construction of 100 studios next to the East Coast Main Line. Residential proposals at this site were refused at site in 2009. Submit comments by 12th April using reference number 14/00877/FUL on the Council’s planning portal.

Craigmillar Town Centre regeneration consultation begins
CraigmillarTCconsultationParc has now started its consultation on plans for Craigmillar Town Centre. With plans for a new high school, retail superstore and affordable housing to be fine tuned, now is the time for residents to have their say. An exhibition on the plans was held today (Thursday, 27th March) but the plans and details of how to respond are available on Parc’s website. Let me know your thoughts as I’d be keen to incorporate these into my own response.

Craigmillar Police Station stays open… for now
SaveOurStationsIn autumn 2013 Police Scotland announced plans to close front desks at ten stations across Edinburgh and cut opening hours at seven more as part of its £4.2 million cost-cutting plan. Portobello has seen its hours cut and Craigmillar residents were told that services would move to the new East Neighbourhood Centre. With most of the closures taking place on 3rd March a bit of a mystery remains about the situation in Craigmillar. As I told the Evening News I’m relieved Craigmillar station is still open (for now). However, I have not been told when the promised move to the new East Neighbourhood Hub will take place with plans still being discussed. Local officers work really hard to get the best results for Craigmillar and I can imagine it is difficult working with such uncertainty.

Events in Parks Response
Last month I provided details of the Events in Parks Manifesto consultation. You can now read my submission on my website.

Meadows to Innocent Railway cycle route
In my December update I gave details of the consultation to improve the Meadows-Innocent Railway cycle link to enhance the safety of this key part of the National Cycle Network. It is expected that the proposals will be made available to the public the week beginning 7 April here.

50th Craigmillar Festival: Volunteers Needed
Volunteers are needed to help organise the Craigmillar Fun Day on 28th June. If you can help make this 50th fun day one to remember please head along to the volunteer meeting on Thursday 3rd April at 6.30pm at The White House. Help is required making costumes, flags & musical instruments for the parade, as well as running activities on the day. If you can’t make it, get in touch on 0780 400 6357 or CFFDC@hotmail.com.

Dates for your Diary
Thursday 3 April 2014 – Understanding Leith Public Meeting: Census 2011 Results Information and Discussion – Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pairce (Parkside Primary School) 139B Bonnington Road – Tour of the School at 6.15 pm, Sign-in and refreshments from 6.45pm

Wednesday 23rd & Thursday 24th April – Meadow Lane Student Accommodation PAN – 4.30pm-7.30pm – David Hume Tower Conference Room

Pedal on Parliament – Saturday the 26th April 2014
Last year I joined 4000 cyclists who pedalled on the Scottish Parliament calling for a more cycle-friendly Scotland. POPers will maintain their momentum and meet again for the third time on 26th April.

The main ride gathers at the Meadows from 11:30am for a 12 noon start. The route will be no more than 1.5 miles and the pace will be slow enough for even the littlest legs, ending at the Scottish Parliament building for speeches. You can see the route on the POP website. Feeder rides are also being planned, including one starting in Portobello from 10.00am at Portobello Swimming Baths.

Craigmillar Books for Babies
Saturday Rhymetimes at Craigmillar Library:

  • Saturday 26th April – How Does Your Garden Grow? – 11.00am-12.00pm
  • Saturday 31st May – 16th Birthday Celebration-Songs, stories and birthday cake. Gift book for every child! For mums, dads, carers and children under 4 – 11.00am-12.00pm
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July 2012 enewsletter | edition 22

Sheila Gilmore MP Header

Westminster Report

New Legislation

Following the Queen’s Speech two new bits of legislation have started the legislative process in the House of Commons. One is the Enterprise & Regulatory Reform Bill which includes the formal establishment of the Green Investment Bank (which arguably isn’t a bank, won’t have much to invest and may not be very green) in addition to changes to Employment Tribunals, which will introduce more conciliation and mediation to the process. The ‘wilder fringe’ ideas of Beecroft which I covered last month are not part of this Bill, nevertheless ‘deregulation’ was a major theme from Government backbenchers during the Second Reading debate on 11th June.

The other new Bill is the Electoral Registration & Administration Bill which introduces ‘individual registration’ of voters. At the moment registration forms are filled in by one member of a household on behalf of the whole household. The proposed system would also require people to show some proof of identity such as national insurance number when registering. There have been many concerns that this could lead to a substantial drop in the number of people registered to vote. This may be particularly so in places, like Edinburgh city centre, where there is a very mobile population and many multi-occupied flats. Registration is already very low there. The draft Bill was looked at by the Political & Constitutional Reform Select Committee which suggested several changes, the Government subsequently applied. Concerns remain and I spoke on this at the Second Hearing on 13th June (See http://bit.ly/Qpor4j).

More debate on Disability Issues

I attended a short Westminster Hall debate secured by a Labour colleague on the impact of the Work Capability Assessment (the assessment for eligibility for Employment and Support Allowance). This test has proved particularly problematic for people with fluctuating conditions like Parkinson’s. In these half hour debates speeches are only made by the person who applied for the debate and the Minister charged with replying. However I was able to make a couple of brief interventions. This debate brought out some interesting points, not least Minister Grayling’s statement that the ‘Gold Standard Review’ was underway, as previously promised. Previous questioning of the Minister had failed to get a date for this work. This Review will be looking particularly at proposals which have come from charities for a different way of assessing fluctuating conditions as well as ‘mental health and cognitive’ conditions.

Much of the debate on ESA has been around the WCA test, but this debate also touched on what happens to people who are placed in what is now called the Work Related Activity Group. This is for people who are not at the time of the test ‘fit for work’ but who are expected to recover in time. Parkinson’s is a particularly problematic condition in this respect. At the moment there is no cure and although the rate of impact differs greatly the concept of ‘returning to fitness’ may be problematic for many who will still be subject to repeated tests. Many people would welcome assistance to return to some sort of work but they report that in practice very little help is given. I’m keen to follow up the experiences of Parkinson’s sufferers in Scotland and plan to have a meeting with Scottish members of Parkinson’s UK over the summer. (Watch the debate here http://bit.ly/LEP7zD.)

Parkinson's UK

On the following day I spoke in an Opposition Day debate on Disability and Social Care. This was wide ranging and considered benefits changes, the cost of care and what is happening to Remploy factories. Among other things I referred to a Report prepared by Learning Disability Alliance Scotland called ‘Worse Off!’ (see http://bit.ly/MD7Gzy) which had looked at the likely impact of the proposed tests for the new ‘Personal Independence Benefit’ by applying the proposed ‘test’ to real people and showing how the changes might affect them. See the debate at http://bit.ly/LEPmuq.

Many questions

No success at PMQs this month, but several opportunities at Departmental questions of various types. At Scottish Questions I got the chance to return to the issue raised by my colleague Kezia Dugdale MSP about the re-badging of existing jobs as apprenticeships. The Minister agreed with our concerns. Sadly you don’t get a second follow-up question as I would like to have pointed out that there are similar concerns about the apprenticeships in England, boasted of by the Government he supports. McDonald’s for example renamed their new starts as apprentices and claimed for the training they would have done anyway. A spokesman from the firm stated in the Sunday Times a few months ago that they had created no new jobs with this money. See the question here: p4 http://bit.ly/LEPmuq.

I make a particular effort to be in both DWP and Treasury questions as these are the areas where I’m trying to concentrate. This month I managed to get questions in at both sessions although I hadn’t been successful in the ‘draw’. My question to the DWP was about the lack of hard information about work experience for young people. At Treasury questions I asked the Government to U turn on the withdrawal of Working Tax Credits for low paid couples working less than 24hours a week using, a real local example of how employers are increasingly offering short hours. See p13 http://bit.ly/Qpvsly and p13 http://bit.ly/Qpvw4S.)

Aung San Suu Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi

The Burmese democracy campaigner spoke to a packed Westminster Hall last Thursday afternoon. She is the first non-head of state to be accorded this honour. We live in a society where we are free to be as cynical as we like about voting and politics, but hearing a speech like this is a salutary reminder of how important but fragile democracy is.

Carers Week

In all the many events I get invited to there are some which jolt you out of complacency (the choice of potential meetings and events some days is truly bewildering). A Carers’ Week event on Monday 18th June at Westminster did that for me. Billed as ‘speed-networking’ – presumably to attract busy MPs – it was an opportunity to meet a variety of carers and carer organisations.

Carers week

I found myself staying longer than I’d originally intended because the stories were so gripping. One woman had spent several years caring for her father and an uncle who had both suffered from Parkinson’s. She then got involved in a local Parkinson’s’ Society only to have her husband struck down by the same illness. She cared for him at home for 16 years. He is now in residential care. Not only did her husband have to stop work early but she too had to leave work at age 52. Her own health has been affected and family income reduced by her early withdrawal from paid work. She needed to spend her savings adapting the house to meet her husband’s needs. She is now topping up her husband’s care home fees from her own pension.

At the other end of the age range I met a young woman who at age 16 became the main carer for her sister and her mother when her mother suffered a stroke. She had to leave school to do it. Now in her early 20s her mother is recovering a bit and she is trying to find some employment but she is finding that employers focus on the ‘gap’ in her qualifications and CV and do not rate her experience – as the household organiser, as advocate, in demonstrating responsibility and reliability. I’m sure if she could get through to the interview stage employers would soon snap her up, as her confidence and poise was remarkable.

Every year there is an outpouring of cross party sympathy from MPs towards carers. But there are huge differences of approach – at one of the ‘tables’ I networked with a Tory MP this came home to me when this MP declared that the problem was that ‘care’ was too expensive due to over regulation. Proponents of this view believe we should drive down costs and the ‘problem’ of social care will be solved. Seeing what has happened to home care Edinburgh, where the council has employed a policy of driving down costs through tendering makes me disagree profoundly with that opinion.

Constituency Report

Craigmillar Books for Babies – five years of activities ahead, and remembering Helen Crummy

Craigmillar Books for BabiesI am delighted to hear that the Craigmillar Literacy Trust has received a Big Lottery Fund award to facilitate Books for Babies activities over the next five years. Craigmillar Books for Babies is an early literacy project based in the area which works with mums, dads & carers with children under 3. The scheme promotes reading as a worthwhile activity to enhance children’s development. As a keen reader I am thrilled that the project is receiving this funding, which will now have the resources to approach families and young people in Craigmillar who might not usually engage with the projects. The full programme of summer events is available at www.craigmillarbooksforbabies.org.uk. I intend to drop into a Rhymetimes session over the summer.

On a similar note, members of the community in Craigmillar are seeking to erect a figurative statue created and erected outside the new East Neighbourhood Office and rename Craigmillar Library in her memory when it is opened. It is so important to the community in Craigmillar that we remember Helen’s work – not simply because she should be commemorated for all she fought for, but so that her legacy will continue inspire others, including the children that will benefit from the Craigmillar Books for Babies programme. She was determined that the people of Craigmillar should have access to the same opportunities in art, drama, and music as people from any other area of the city, and should be duly commemorated. I have written to the Neighbourhood Manager in support of the proposals; if you wish to view my letter, click here: http://bit.ly/LB21N0.

Innertube map 2012

I’m pleased to hear that ELGT, The Bike Station and the People’s Postcode Trust have started work to promote and enhance Edinburgh’s cycleways and off-road paths over the summer. Groups have already been out clearing fly tipping and tackling invasive species along many of the paths, so everyone can take advantage of the network over the next few months. I am also pleased that last year’s highly successful Postcode Challenge Treasure Hunt on Wheels will return on Sunday 1st July. For details of the work and the treasure hunt, go to: http://bit.ly/NwETwi.

I Love cycling and Innertube Map

Bike-related events are in full swing this time of year, and while I couldn’t attend Spokes’ bicycle breakfast on 20th June, I made sure I joined in totalpolitics call to get as many MPs as possible joining the I Love Cycling campaign – you can see my pledge here: http://bit.ly/N00IHj.

Protecting Guide Dogs

New figures that were released in June showed attacks on guide dogs are at an all time high and now running at an average of eight a month. The government is currently consulting on compulsory microchipping but has said its preferred option is to microchip puppies only. Under this plan, it would take 10 to 15 years before all dogs are microchipped. I have joined the campaign organised by Guide Dogs UK which calls for action to protect guide dogs from attacks by other dogs. Compulsory microchipping is one step that would make a real difference. Ultimately campaigners are calling for changes in the law so an attack on an assistance dog is treated as seriously as an attack on a person because the harm caused to the dog seriously impairs the freedom of the owner.

Property Conservation developments

Many of you will have read that the Director of City Development has been suspended from his post as the Statutory Notice investigation continues (see http://bbc.in/LPoX9G). Mr Anderson was responsible for overseeing the City Development department when it held responsibility for Property Conservation across the city. Back when I started receiving complaints, and before the investigation started, constituents and I experienced considerable delays when any complaints or simple queries were raised. At the time I didn’t feel that the department was handling the complaints properly or acknowledging that there were problems with the system. In light of the managerial suspension, I have written to Sue Bruce, Chief Executive of the City of Edinburgh Council, to highlight that many concerns were raised in advance of the investigation. The Leader of the Council, Cllr Andrew Burns, has also indicated that reports due before Policy and Strategy Committee in August will highlight how the Council will deal with the current problems and outline how a new service will function.

Campaign for High Speed Rail (CfHSR) update

Together with other Edinburgh MPs I am calling on Edinburgh residents to show their support for high speed rail. The Spectator has recently predicted that the Government is set to make a U-turn on its commitment to build HS2. It asserted that there was ‘a lack of enthusiasm among the people it was supposed to impress: northerners, Midlanders and business.’ Once the second phase of this major infrastructure project is complete, the Edinburgh to London journey will be cut by an hour to 3 hours 30 minutes, benefitting Edinburgh and Scotland as a whole. Scottish MPs have been calling on the Government to build the second phase beyond Leeds and Manchester and on to Edinburgh and Glasgow and it would be a disaster if the project were dropped altogether. HS2 will benefit Scotland from the outset, and today we are encouraging Edinburgh residents to show their support by going to www.campaignforhsr.com/signup

Southside buses update

Having written in the May edition about the re-routing of the number 2 away from St Leonard’s Street, I thought it might be welcome news that Lothian Buses has made further changes in the city centre to serve the Lauriston and University areas. For over 18 years there has been no direct bus linking Newington, the Southside and Tollcross, however, from the 24th June, the number 47 has been re-routed to serve the area. The 47 will run from Surgeon’s Hall via Nicolson Square, Potterrow, Lauriston Place, Tollcross, Festival Square and Lothian Rd to rejoin its former route at the West End. This will be the first time in decades that a bus will link Newington, Southside and Tollcross, and I am sure it will be a welcome amenity. The new route also provides a route to the West End which avoids the tramworks! The revised timetable is available at http://bit.ly/Or3fO6.

Bongo Lives!

Late last month, I was very relieved to hear that one of Holyrood’s best loved institutions has been given a reprieve. I’m referring to the Bongo Club of course – after months of campaigning and petitioning the University of Edinburgh, the Bongo Club has had its lease extended for the Hogmanay period and into 2013. The extra time will allow the management of the club space to continue trading through the crucial festival period, before the management finds new premises. For the thousands of people who visit the Bongo Club every year and those who appreciate its value to the city, the news will be very welcome.

Over the summer months

Since the regulated period of the local elections ended I have been on a number of roving surgeries in Lochend, the Southside, and in the City Centre. When I hold a roving surgery I write directly to constituents and ask if they would like a visit, instead of advertising my usual surgeries which require constituents having to come and see me. Folk that I meet really enjoy the opportunity to raise their concerns in their own home. Holding the surgeries also means that individuals with mobility issues can speak to me without the worry of having to plan a journey. I intend to hold a few more roving surgeries over the summer – if you would like me to visit your street, please contact me on 0131 661 7522 sheila.gilmore.mp@parliament.uk.

Dates for your diary

Saturday 30 June – Craigmillar Olympic Fun Day – 12:00-16:00 – off Niddrie Mains Road at Wauchope Terrace – more details at http://bit.ly/LrXRTo.

Saturday 30 June – Pride Scotia Rally and March – from 13:00 – meet at the City Chambers Quadrant, Royal Mile – further details at http://www.pride-scotia.org/

Sunday 1st July – Postcode Challenge Treasure Hunt on Wheels – 13:00-16:00 – for full details see http://bit.ly/NwETwi.

From Monday 2nd July to 14th July Tuesday 3rd July –Bus Stop Lottery Photography Project Exhibition – free exhibition 10:00-16:00 – Craigmillar Community Arts Centre, Newcraighall Road

Tuesday 3rd July – The Welfare Reform Bill – What is it? Is it Right? Is it necessary? What can you do? –1830 onwards – Northfield Community Centre, Northfield Road.

Wednesday 4th August 2012 – Free Holyrood Wellbeing Walks (summer programme) – from 13:00 – every Wednesday until 8th August – book on 0131 652 8150

Thursday 5th August 2012– Edmesh 25th Anniversary Garden Party –13:00-14:00 – Duddingston Kirk, Duddingston Village – Edinburgh ME self-help group anniversary meeting, further details available at: http://bit.ly/Or0z2T.

Saturday 7th July– Portobello Organic Market – 9.30-13.30 – Brighton Park – full list of stalls can be found here: http://bit.ly/LCVBx5.

Saturday 28th July– Donkeyfield Community Orchard Workday – from 10:00 – Donkeyfield orchard near Brunstane Rail Station – further details at http://bit.ly/LrYoET

Craigmillar Books for Babies – summer programme available at www.craigmillarbooksforbabies.org.uk/whatson.htm.

Friday 10th August– Portobello and Craigmillar Family Summer Bash – 13:00-16:00 – Jack Kane Centre, Niddrie Mains Road – all activities are free

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Mail Room: Protection of hares

A lot of people contact me about animal welfare issues.While this is not an area I have a particular background in I am happy to do what I can to promote the issue in Parliament.

Recently, the protection of hares has been high on the agenda. Following a huge number of letters and emails I took action on this by signing Early Day Motion (EDM) 2531 which calls for a close season for hare shooting to be introduced UK-wide. You can view my signature here.

In addition to the EDM I also wrote to Caroline Spellman MP, Secretary of State for the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs asking her to address my constituents’ concerns. I emphasized that new legislation has been introduced in Scotland which will protect hares by making it an offence to intentionally or recklessly kill or injure them during their breeding season.

You can read the reply that I received from Richard Benyon MP below:

Letter from Minister regarding Hares(If you can’t read the text of this letter you just need to click on it a couple of times to view it in full screen and then again to zoom in)

I found the Minister’s response broadly positive as he appeared sympathetic to the cause I raised. I set out my response in a further letter to my constituents that you can see below:

I have recently received a letter dated 21March 2012 from Richard Benyon MP, Minister for Natural Environment and Fisheries, regarding the protection of hares. Please find a copy attached. This was sent in response to my letter to the Secretary of State of 8 March, which was sent following your initial email.

In my letter I noted that new legislation has been introduced in Scotland which will protect hares by making it an offence to intentionally or recklessly killing or injure them during their breeding season. I also noted that the objective set in 1995 of doubling springtime population numbers by 2010 was not met, highlighting the need for further action on this issue. I emphasized to the Minister that the hare population is under serious threat in the UK and that I shared your concerns on this issue.

Mr Benyon’s response is broadly positive. While he concedes that at the present time Ministers do not have the ability to create close seasons for animals such as the brown hare without primary legislation, he notes that the Law Commission is currently reviewing wildlife management legislation with a view to making improvements in the future. As the Minister acknowledges that it will be some time before any changes are made law, he indicates that he has written to the relevant organisations to seek views on measures that could be taken to minimise adverse welfare impacts on hares in the meantime.

I hope this response is of use to you. Once again, thank you for taking the time to contact me.

Of course if you would like to comment further on this issue, you can contact me by email on sheila.gilmore.mp@parliament.uk.

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